Adverse psychosocial profile common in women with diabetes, acute coronary syndromeAdverse psychosocial profile common in women with diabetes, acute coronary syndrome

Women with diabetes and incident acute coronary syndrome are more likely to report depression and anxiety compared with women without diabetes and men with diabetes, according to findings published in Diabetic Medicine.

Louise Pilote, MD, MPH, PhD, professor in the department of medicine, division of general internal medicine, faculty of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, and colleagues evaluated data from the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study on premature acute coronary syndrome on 287 women (14.3% with type 2 diabetes) and 652 men (10.4% with type 2 diabetes) to determine whether behavioral and psychosocial factors contribute to disparities in risk and outcomes.

Compared with participants without diabetes, participants with diabetes were more likely to be obese (< .001) and have greater waist to hip ratio. There was a trend toward more insulin use in women with diabetes compared with men with diabetes (19.5% vs. 7.35%; = .06).

Moderate to strenuous physical activity was reported by more women with diabetes compared with men with diabetes (65.9% vs. 45.6%; = .04). Being the primary earner was reported by more women with diabetes compared with women without diabetes (63.4% vs. 41.9%; = .01).

Participants with diabetes were more likely to have depression compared with participants without diabetes (women, = .03; men, < .001). Anxiety was more likely to be reported by women with diabetes compared with women without diabetes (= .08) and men with diabetes (= .06). Lower levels of perceived physical health were reported by women with diabetes compared with men with diabetes (= .03).

The risk for presenting with premature acute coronary syndrome was higher among women with diabetes compared with men without diabetes (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 0.83-2.36).

“Considering trends in the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes and strong evidence for diabetes as a predominant marker of cardiovascular risk and mortality among women, identification of factors that could be potentially modified to alter risk and change outcomes is of great interest,” the researchers wrote. “Future studies with a control group and prospective design will be helpful to further investigate the relationship between psychological factors and acute coronary syndrome incidence and outcomes by sex and diabetes status.”

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